Readers’ Recommend List #1

The ‘Readers’ Recommend List’ is a community-curated listicle of must-reads, handpicked by our passionate readers.

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Hey there book lovers!

We took to our Instagram to find out what books you’re currently devouring and wow, you came through! The responses were delightful and we’d love for the world to discover your favourite titles. So here’s a list of your highly recommended books, handpicked by fellow reading enthusiasts like you. Read on!

@stephfigpope:
Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner

“Save your tears for when your mother dies.”

A beautifully written memoir that explores identity, grief, and cultural heritage through the lens of food. A must-read for fans of lyrical prose and introspective storytelling, this powerful book will leave you feeling moved and inspired.

@zafaranart:
Tomb of Sand by Geetanjali Shree

“Anything worth doing transcends borders.”

Captivating novel set in India that explores themes of identity, tradition, and social change. Through atmospheric writing and complex characters, the story follows a young woman on a journey to uncover her family’s dark secrets.

@himani_0305:
Train to Pakistan by Khushwant Singh

“To err is human, to forgive divine.”

A masterful blend of historical fiction and social commentary, this classic offers a powerful look at the complexities of communal tension and violence in India during Partition. The story takes place in the small village of Mano Majra, located on the border between the two new nations, and revolves around the arrival of a train carrying dead bodies of Hindus and Sikhs.

@raoulghosh:
Snow by Orhan Pamuk

“Heaven was the place where you kept alive the dreams of your memories.”

A thought-provoking novel that explores the intersection of politics, religion, and identity in contemporary Turkey. The story revolves around the arrival of a mysterious stranger named Ka, a poet and political exile, who stirs up the small town of Kars with his ideas and writing.

@nay_roast:
Before the Coffee Gets Cold by Toshikazu Kawaguchi

“At the end of the day, whether one returns to the past or travels to the future, the present doesn’t change.”

This charming and touching story takes you on a journey through four lives, as its characters navigate the complexities of love, loss and the human condition. The novel is set in a small café in Tokyo where customers are able to travel back in time to meet with loved ones or to revisit a particular moment in their lives.

@aishnee_03:
War of Lanka by Amish Tripathi

“Grief can provide the fuel for greatness, but it can also be the trigger for evil.”

This book is a thrilling and epic retelling of the Hindu mythological classic, the Ramayana. Through action-packed storytelling and richly drawn characters, it offers a fresh perspective on one of India’s greatest epic tales, as it brings the ancient world to life in a whole new way.

@unnati_aroraah:
Conversations on Love by Natasha Lunn

“In my earliest efforts at love, imagination was a thief that stole truth and perspective.”

An insightful and heartwarming novel that explores the power of love and relationships through a series of interviews with individuals from different cultures and backgrounds. The book features a diverse range of voices, including writers, artists, psychologists, and everyday people, who share their personal experiences and perspectives on love.

@_nightt_reader:
Cleopatra and Frankenstein by Coco Mellors

Sweetheart, love is humiliating. Hasn’t anyone ever told you that?”

This debut novel from Mellors is a modern romance between Cleo, a 20-something artist who hails from England and Frank, a media mogul in his forties. Set in New York, the novel is about relationships and the choices we make.

@bookishruti:
Love in South Asia by Francesca Orsini

“We can write a history of love as a concept or language, as a social institution, and as an artistic ideal.”

Through a rich blend of historical and cultural analysis, this must-read book offers a unique and insightful view of love and its role in South Asian society, exploring everything from poetry and literature to film and popular culture.

@ekasmayi:
More Die of Heartbreak by Saul Bellow

“But in the end I said, It’s terribly serious, of course, but I think more people die of heartbreak than of radiation.”

With its insightful writing and unforgettable characters, this novel tells the story of a botanist named Benn Crader, who receives a mysterious letter from his estranged uncle, a scientist named Kenneth Trachtenberg, that sets in motion a series of events that challenge Crader’s understanding of the world.

@perhapsonpaper:
Ham on Rye by Charles Bukowski

“All a guy needed was a chance. Somebody was always controlling who got a chance and who didn’t.”

Gritty and powerful coming-of-age novel that offers a raw and unapologetic look at growing up in 20th century America. Through Bukowski’s unique writing style and unsparing depiction of life’s difficulties, this book offers a deeply affecting look at the human experience and the quest for identity.

@theblahcksheep
On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwen

“He was making one of the advances typical of early adulthood: the discovery that there were new values by which he preferred to be judged.”

Set against the backdrop of the early 1960s, On Chesil Beach delves into the complexities of love, sexuality, and societal expectations. The story follows a young couple on their honeymoon, as they navigate their conflicting desires on their wedding night. Through their struggle, McEwan raises questions about the human experience and the power of personal choices.


Happy reading!

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